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Part 2: Tools & Info for Sysadmins - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part 1)
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments or suggestions.
u/crispyducks
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IT Pro Tuesday #64 (part 2) - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part 1)
Captura is a flexible tool for capturing your screen, audio, cursor, mouse clicks and keystrokes. Features include mixing audio recorded from microphone and speaker output, command-line interface, and configurable hotkeys. Thanks to jantari for the recommedation.
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments.
Graham | CEO | EveryCloud
submitted by crispyducks to ITProTuesday [link] [comments]

Tools & Info for MSPs #2 - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part #1)
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments.
Graham | CEO | EveryCloud
Fyi - I've set up a subreddit /itprotuesday, where we feature / encourage posts of some additional tools, tips etc. throughout the week. Pop over and subscribe if you’re interested.
submitted by crispyducks to msp [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: We are the Firefox User Experience team, this is your chance to tell us about your pet peeves!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-03-08
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
What are you replacing it with? Feel free to take my notes as suggestions for operations which I hope are [easily] possible with whatever mechanism replaces this. I don't think we'll be encouraging plugins at all, it's not something we believe is part of the web. It was a necessary evil back in the 90s, but browsers can do pretty much anything a plugin is capable of these days.
I like you guys. We like you too.
Hm... not sure I agree with that sentiment. I'm no fan of plugins in most cases, but it seems like there are quite a few businesses which use them for various reasons, and you might be closing off a large part of the market without the feature. They'll still be able to install plugins — it's just that we are not going to go out of our way to convince you to install the plugin — that's their job. ;)
Now kiss. Link to i.imgur.com
I am a user of google chrome. what would make me switch to firefox? Firefox is built by Mozilla, a non-profit organization who's mission is to make the web better, more open, and more accessible, for everybody.
We have no interest in making money off of you. We're interested in making your web experience better, safer, and more secure.
If a choice came to us where we had to choose between making boatloads of money, or making things better for our users, we would 100% always choose making things better for our users. Every time.
If we had shareholders, they'd probably crap themselves. That's why we don't have them, and will never have them.
So, I guess there's my pitch. Our browser is built for you, and not as a vehicle to make us money. We'll never compromise on your safety, privacy, or security.
Plus, we're community driven. Come join us. :\)
Now lets talk on the technical side, Why switch from chrome to Firefox from a technical point of view? There are a couple of angles on this. First of all, we're 100% open source. You can read all of Firefox's source code. Every byte in the compiled binary is public for you to gawk at. And help with.
Chrome is not this way. The Chromium project, which Chrome is based on, is open-source, but then they take the Chromium code, pump in some other things that are closed (their own home-brew of Flash, and some other stuff), and that's what becomes Chrome.
Other technical reasons...our add-on ecosystem is far richer, and our add-ons framework is far more powerful... we tend to use less memory than Chrome (I'm serious) since we don't copy the process per tab...
There are more reasons I could list, but I also have a huge backlog of questions to answer. :)
Whose mission* I stand corected.
I love Firefox, and it is my primary choice for browsing. The one feature that bothers me though is that if I want to go to Private Browsing (Ctrl+Shift+P), my current window disappears. This can be annoying especially when I have a video open and when I get back to normal browsing it starts from the beginning and not where I left it. Have you thought about changing this practice so that a private browsing page opens completely on a new window? Thanks. Yes we have, and you can try per-Windows private browsing in Firefox 20 beta, Link to www.mozilla.org
It has been fixed, and is coming to Firefox in version 20, if I remember correctly.
Starting in Firefox 20 (currently in beta), we support per-window private browsing! You can get the beta here to use it today: Link to www.mozilla.org
I use a dark windows theme. Any way to fix this? File a bug! Link to bugzilla.mozilla.org
Why is there no Windows 64 bit version of Firefox? 64bit Firefox isn't a priority, as there are few benefits, and it's alot of work when there are other, large and more important projects to work on. 32bit Firefox runs well on 64bit windows for the time being.
Do you have to have a degree to apply for a design job at Mozilla/Firefox? or can you apply if you have relevant experience? Thanks for doing this AMA :) We have lots of people that are school dropouts, so it's certainly not a requirement. If you're talented, we'd love to talk to you!
Hey guys. Long time Firefox user but it is a bit of a memory hog. Any plans to slim it down? Yep, we've been tracking that, and have made some improvements. Of course, if you have the memory, doesn't it make sense to trade some higher memory usage for better speed?
We are always working on improving memory usage in Firefox (we have a team called memshrink working on it in every release). Have you tried Firefox 19 after a Firefox Reset?
We've been slimming down Firefox a lot in recent months - we call it the MemShrink project.
And we've been making pretty decent strides! See areweslimyet.com for a graph of our progress.
I should also point out that add-ons are almost always the first suspect when it comes to memory leaks and consumption. We've made that a bit better in recent versions of Firefox (since Firefox 15\).
At the moment, Firefox generally does better on memory than any of the other browsers in independent tests. So yes, it's a lot better these days, and we keep working on it! Check out the MemShrink project.
What happened to Australis? Why we have different tab style between Thunderbird and Firefox? Link to i.imgur.com
Wow it's beautiful! When will it come to Linux? Hey - I'm working on the Linux GTK port as we speak.
Curvy tabs are currently available in our UX Nightly builds.. Your distro might have UX in its package universe too, if you didn't want to grab the nightly from us.
Did you see that guys? limi rick-rolled us! I tried to be subtle about it. ;)
Will there be an option to turn of curvy tabs for those who don't want it? One of the reasons I switched from chrome to FF was because I prefer the current look of the tabs in FF 18. I'm sure somebody will develop a theme to switch you back. Without fail, when we introduce something, somebody in the community introduces an add-on that will switch you back. ;)
But that person will not be me - I'm biased, but I quite like the new tabs.
Have to use? Are you limited in what version of Flash you can use? Yes. The NPAPI version. IE does ActiveX, Chrome does Pepper.
Hey, not really much of a poster, but I love Firefox and as a graduating senior (related to this field), I figured I might get in on the act. What do you guys see as the single most important thing a person trying to get into the UX field can do to better themselves? Experience.
Build a product with someone, put everyday people in front of it, and watch it fall apart as they try to use it. Then, iterate until it doesn't. :)
Have a design process that you are able to communicate clearly to others. Even better if your design process is research-driven. :)
Why doesn't audio go through the browser as a middle-man so the browser knows which tabs are blaring music, etc? (And so you could mute a tab). Because Flash.
(Yes, I'd love to have this fixed too)
Because the NPAPI that Flash uses to hook into Firefox doesn't allow for this.
And we could spend resources altering the API and convincing Adobe to change Flash to work with it (unlikely)...
Or maybe it's time to do something a little webbier with Flash, like we did with PDFs...
Are any of you guys working on Firefox OS? I've contributed a teeny-tiny thing to Firefox OS, but that was just in my spare time.
If so how do you feel about jumping into this field as its a huge undertaking! I don't want to speak for the whole community, but I think it's safe to say that we're pumped. According to some of the old hands in the community, this feeling very much resembles the one we had before diving into the desktop browser world, and taking on IE. Gonna disrupt mobile and open it up. Feels good.
A sign of a close-interlinked company. IMO, more accurately, the sign of a vibrant, healthy, exciting community. Community > company.
An explicit goal for Firefox OS is to run well on low-end hardware.
INTEGRATED VOLUME CONTROL!!!? I would PAY for that! So would we! Unfortunately, it's pretty hard to do when Flash works the way it does.
I believe currently the entire interface currently uses CSS to mimic the native platforms UI. This is only partly true. Yes, we define the interface using the XUL language and CSS, but for certain things, we defer to the operating system to tell us how to draw things.
For example, I'm working on getting the tabs into the titlebar on OSX. The titlebar that we're using in this build is a XUL hbox with the -moz-appearance CSS property (non-standard) set to -moz-window-titlebar.
When we do that, we signal Gecko's widget layer that we want this to look like the native titlebar, and the code responsible for Cocoa widgetry takes care of painting that for us.
The same is true with things like progress bars. Those are XUL progressmeters, but we're definitely not drawing those ourselves.
The upshot about this is that we can (usually) use the same XUL across each platform, and then let the CSS and widgetry layer define how we paint it.
Things like scrollbars and bounce behaviours are pretty hard, but we're getting there. We've recently hired more Cocoa talent to work on this stuff, so you might start seeing it sooner rather than later.
Speaking of, if you're interested in trying tabs in the titlebar on OSX, a demo version should be appearing in tomorrow's UX Nightly builds...
I hope I answered your question!
Awesome! Any idea when it make it into the release version? I currently open Chrome when I need a clean private session. According to the release calendar, Firefox 20 moves to the release channel on April 1st. (And no, I'm not joking. :) )
Install a tracking cookie that alerts you to when I try do download another browser and then makes me click a whole bunch of "are you sure?" windows. Good idea. Maybe throw in a toolbar too. :D.
I have to restore last session to get my tabs to reopen. Ah, you mean that if there's a stray window and you close what you think is the last window, you lose your session. There is a timer (I believe) that is supposed to fix that, so have you experienced it lately?
If i somehow miss a stupid popup window (why do some websites still use those fucking things?) when closing firefox i lose that session, its annoying as all hell. If/when that happens, you can access the History menu (via the Firefox button in the top left on Windows or the menu bar on OS X) and reopen your window(s) from the Recently Closed Windows sub-menu.
I understand that your main source of revenue is referral fees from the search bar at the top right of the page. I like google as my search engine. I'm wondering, if I set my homepage (or go) to google and search from their bar directly, does Mozilla still get the referral fee? No, you have to use either the built-in search box, enter your search in the URL bar, or use our built-in home page (about:home). At least as far as I know, I'm not on the business development team. :)
Thanks for the reply! I'll keep going top right. Top left works too. :)
Thanks for the support! :) You also have the ability to donate directly to the foundation.
Or you can come get involved! Firefox is powered by the community, and we always want more. You don't need to be a coder - we need help with testing, support, triage...all sorts of stuff.
Come join us. :)
Edit: accidentally a word.
What kind of user testing do you guys do? Do you do in-lab studies, field work, focus groups? Hi! I'm a Senior UX Researcher at Mozilla.
We use a huge range of user research techniques. The primary ones that we use (in no particular order):
Qualitative, ethnographic interviews in the field (esp. in participants' home or office)
Diary studies.
Quantitative surveys.
Studies of user behavior using Test Pilot and Micropilot
User testing.
In terms of how we implement and use these techniques, we prefer to use multiple techniques within a single project (for example, a series of qualitative interviews, a diary study, and a quantitative survey). Using multiple approaches, allows us to answer questions that we can't answer with only one technique. Also, multiple approaches allows us to triangulate and validate the results from the different techniques among one another.
We do not have a lab nor do we intend to use one in the near future. As much as we are able to do so, we are firm believers in observing and understanding the actual context in which people use our products.
Saving images is slow, and I cannot figure out why. I usually just save pictures that are ALREADY DISPLAYED. Why is copying the file out of the cache folder 1000x fasater than right-click->save as? Your anti-virus software, if you have any, might be at fault here. Try disabling it, and seeing if this persists.
That's a good question. Did you file a bug? Link to bugzilla.mozilla.org
Also work in a support, and very often advice people to change to Firefox. Your new .pdf browser really makes the difference when having to choose between Chrome and Firefox, when changing from IE. Link to limi.net
As for improvements to it, my biggest issue was that if you opened a ton of tabs\windows (to the point where it became slow), you couldn't speed it up again by just closing tabs\windows. The only reason I can think this happens is that the tabs are kept in memory until you restart the browser. Perhaps I'm wrong, but if that's the case, couldn't you just keep a list of the closed windows\tabs page addresses, and re-connect to them? If not, go to Link to support.mozilla.org and we can help fix those crashes for you. Just making sure, you did a reset too?
If you enter "about:crashes" in the URL bar, you should see a list of reported crashes. If you've still got entries there, post a few recent IDs here (or PM me), and I'll take a look to see if it indicates what might be wrong.
Chrome starts up almost instantly... Firefox always takes a good 5-10 seconds to start up... just wondering if you guys have plans to implement faster start up? That's an unacceptably slow start time. Have you tried resetting Firefox?
If Firefox takes 5-10 seconds to start up, there's definitely something wrong.
Try updating to the latest version, and then Reset Firefox?
Link to support.mozilla.org
I don't see any way to pop them out into another window like Chrome, which is extremely helpful. On the latest Nightly, there is a button next to the close button of the Devtools console that pops it open into a new window. Not sure what release this is in, but it's coming.
I don't see anything for profiling JS/CSS/etc A JS profiler has been added to Firefox 20, currently in beta.
When there is too much horizontal pressure on the tabs, Firefox uses a carousel combined with a drop down that shows all the tabs. IE will use a carousel without a dropdown. Chrome will just shrink the tabs and will eventually prevent you from browsing any new tabs created. What were the reasons that lead you towards selecting a carousel and dropdown? What kind of telemetry do you see with users actually filling the tabs and using the overflow features? Do they use the dropdown often in those cases, or rely more often on the carousel? Actually, we have plans for improving that part. Most of it was done before we had any user behavior information at all, and it turns out it's not exactly optimal. (Not that other browsers do better :)
I was under the impression that tab groups were more or less unsupported at this point. Eg, nobody working on fixing bugs or improving the integration with app tabs and other things. Is this not true? What are the future plans for them? It is kind of stopped now since we are figuring out a plan to move it forward. It's definitely on the list of things that need some design love :)
Any plans to integrate support of Remote Web Workplace? I'd never use IE again if I could initiate "Connect to a Computer" option through remote web workplace on Mozilla. I'm not sure but I think its ActiveX. You are correct, Remote Web Workplace is ActiveX. ActiveX cant be run in Firefox and there are no plans to integrate that (It's a proprietary Microsoft technology that is very insecure and bad for the web).
Why do you want to set every fox on fire? Renewable energy.
I have a pet peeve / interface suggestion if that's ok. I kind of dislike that the options window is a separate, "pop-up" window, and not integrated into a tab (kind of like the add-ons manager is). Is it possible to change this in the future? While not a programmer myself, I understand enough that, probably, the first method one might consider in making this happen is to allow changing of settings via html or whatever (so that it could be put into the tab like a webpage might), but that could open firefox up to security vulnerabilities and other problems. One reason I would like to get rid of the popup options window though is that I sometimes need to change my font size minimums in order to view some pages properly. I prefer to leave them around 18-point for better readability, but some sites' formatting makes the words/labels bleed out of their boxes that they've so strictly designed to fit 12-point and nothing else. So I was thinking it might be nice to leave the options window open... but you can't do anything like browse or change tabs while it is open as a popup, especially when it stays on top of the browser window. If it was a tab though, it would be no problem. Also, I am aware of, and use, add-ons like No-Squint and such, but they don't always help due to a page's "over-done formatting". Plus I guess I just kinda have my own way of doing things though, you know? Well, there's my $0.02. We're doing exactly that! The preferences will be moved to a tab.
Guys I really do not have any. I love firefox. But if I had to ask you...You guys ever thought about incorporating ghostery into the standard package? We've made several changes in that direction (e.g. Do Not Track), and stopped accepting cookies from third-party providers (unless you have visited their site already). Implementing all of what Ghostery does would probably massively break the web. When you have a few hundred million users, you have to move carefully with these things. The web is (for better or worse) an advertising economy.
As for me personally — yes, I think we need to do even more. But it's more complex than it appears at first glance. :)
I use a master password in FF, but when the wrong pass is entered cookies are still retained, so another user could get into Facebook (for example). I know I can log out of FB daily but that sucks. Can we make the master password close the cookie jar? Yeah, Master Password needs a redesign.
Blake can you link me to bugs/wikimo pages about that? Looks like it'll have serious implications for my new tab add-on. I don't think there is any of that yet. The prototype is mostly stuff that UX is playing around with to see if we can make that page better for users. But throw me some email (at my username at mozilla.com), and I'll let you know when stuff moves forward…
What are your opinions on the add on Add Blocker and the possible income it takes away from websites? AdBlock actually allows unobtrusive ads, so I like the way it forces ad agencies to play nicer.
For me this is usually just a timing issue. I open it too fast after closing, and it works fine when I try again. So can you not just have the new process wait a second after the first failure and then try again before popping the error? That's a good idea. Yes, something along these lines might be a good mitigating solution.
Why does Firefox eat all my memory? Out of the three web browsers I use Firefox is the most demanding memory wise and usually causes my computer to have problems. Dell Xps M1330 Win 7 64bit ultimate 4GB RAM Intel core 2 duo. Link to support.mozilla.org
Is there a reason that you go with separate search and URL bars, rather than a Chrome-style universal search bar thingy? Historical reasons. And some privacy ones. We do want to merge them.
What is the deal with "Plug in container"? It fucks up all the time and eats all my memory. Ever since you guys added that Firefox has kinda sucked. That's Flash sucking, not Firefox.
Not a peeve, but an idea I'd like to see: Being able to easily identify which open tab is producing sound. More than once I've had to close down my browser because some ad with sound started playing and I couldn't find which ad on which page was playing it. Curiously enough, I just got email about this. Someone has a patch that adds a global volume control, and controls to mute all the tabs, or all the non-visible tabs. So that's certainly something we'll be looking into… :)
I answered this over here.
It's quite annoying when you exit out of Firefox then immediately try to open it again it gives you the "Firefox is already running in another process" error. Other than that, love Firefox! Yeah, that does suck indeed.
What's happening is that Firefox is still in the process of closing, even though the window has disappeared. When you try to re-open Firefox, it flips out, because the first process hasn't finished up yet.
The performance team is working hard on this on the "exit(0)" project. It's a P1 goal. You can track our progress in this bug. (make sure to follow Bugzilla etiquette if it's your first time).
Yeah, this sounds like it is not shutting down fast enough. Try a reset?
Link to support.mozilla.org
That's when I open the task manager and shut down that process. Hold the pillow over it's face. Sleeep... No tears now. I enjoyed this comment. Have an upvote.
Ending the process, I find, works like a charm. Yes, but it shouldn't be necessary! Try the reset. :)
smooth as butter for several hours. Then, after that, everything gets laggylaggylaggy One thing we are considering is to unload tabs you haven't used in hours/days from memory, similar to how we restore background tabs on-demand when you restart.
I never know if Firefox is going to remember my tabs from last time or not. When Firefox starts: Show my windows and tabs from last time.
I'm sure our performance team would be interested in the output of the built-in Profiler, if you can capture it when it's lagging… One thing we are considering is to unload tabs you haven't used in hours/days from memory, similar to how we restore background tabs on-demand when you restart. Here are docs on how to report a performance problem when you come across them: Link to developer.mozilla.org
I wish sync was easier to use/understand. I just want to to put in my username and password and have my browsers sync across all PC's that use. We definitely agree and there is very active work going on to make this happen. Please stay tuned!
Yup, Sync is a bit of a mess, and is being re-done.
One of the things that I wanted to tackle when I started at Mozilla was re-doing sync because I thought it was really cool, but an impenetrable user experience for most users. Turns out, looking at our data it is an impenetrable user experience for most users.
It is in the process of being completely redone and integrating other data services that you would want to sync among your devices.
Sync is such a mess im amazed it got the get-go to roll. I'm an IT guy myself, but even I hate it so much that I use chrome at times when I need this functionality. You're not the only one. I don't think anyone likes it in its current state. (and yes, then the question is… why did it ship?)
Oddly enough, I actually love it in its current state. <3.
One wish: manually control if i want a PDF to be viewed in firefox or downloaded. It seems that the website usually decides this and it is annoying as hell when they guess wrong. Thanks! You can tell Firefox what to do with PDFs in the Options (or Preferences) dialog, under the "Applications" pane.
Find "PDF" in that list, and then set the action on the right.
I don't know if this is a known bug, but anytime I'm on a page with a Flash player, particularly YouTube, I can no longer use my computer's volume control buttons. Flash integration is always a pain, and especially around focus issues. Flash is allowed to steal keyboard shortcuts etc, which is very frustrating. It was our #1 paper cut issue three years ago, and it still is. Luckily, Flash is slowly disappearing. That doesn't mean we shouldn't do everything we can to fix this issue in the meantime, though. (Both IE and Chrome have a different version of Flash than the one we have to use, which makes things complicated.) This has been a reoccurring issue since Flash 11.3 was released. Can you go to about:addons and see what version of Flash is installed? I just checked mine and I actually had 2 (?!) versions of Flash installed (11.5 and 11.6). Uninstalling Flash through the Control Panel (on Windows) and reinstalling clean from Adobe's site gave me Flash 11.6 and I can no longer reproduce the bug. I hope that helps.
Works fine in IE, and Chrome, but not in Firefox.
I feel like it's the only thing that truly bugs me about the browser. Other than that, great work, I don't think I'll be changing anytime soon.
Flash hijacks most keyboard input, so even commands like control-w (to close the tab) don't work. I know this has an open ticket (and has for a while) but I would really love to see it fixed. Me too!
We have people working on it as we speak! You will see a better new tab soon. And for now you can hide the boxes by clicking on the grid thing on the upper right of the page. A terrible-looking example of one of the designs we're looking into is at this prototype page.
I use Firefox for porn, thanks. If you're not using Firefox Beta, Aurora, or Nightly, then you're in for a treat when you check them out.
EDIT: Fuck yeah, thanks for the reddit gold! We now have a new implementation of our Private Browsing that will open in a separate window instead of swapping your current browsing context.
If you're not using Firefox Beta, Aurora, or Nightly, then you're in for a treat when you check them out. We now have a new implementation of our Private Browsing that will open in a separate window instead of swapping your current browsing context. Engagement rings for everybody!
I was kinda confused when I would do my normal Ctrl Shift P and it now pops up a Private WINDOW instead of closing the regular window altogether and opening a purple private one. Now it's just too easy to close up when you're done. You don't have to restart all your tabs! I get kinda confused when I hit Cmd-Shift-[ to switch tabs, and get a new Private Window, cause my fingers are shifted over a key… ;)
Keep your strong stance on user privacy and you'll have me as a user forever. You can count on it.
We do our best!
But how will we know? ;-)
Having the options and settings in the upper left hand under "Firefox" is confusing and the opposite of Chrome and Internet Explorer in Windows, which leads to training headaches with users. We're moving the menu to the right side, see the Australis redesign project.
I agree, this is ridiculous, and I complain about it every chance I get. Can you say "pet peeve"? :D.
We have lots of people that are school dropouts, so it's certainly not a requirement. If you're talented, we'd love to talk to you! A link to our careers page would probably be useful here, too… ;)
Last updated: 2013-03-13 05:50 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA hacker who is currently in Federal Prison, AMA.

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-03-21
Link to submission(Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
I heard many times hackers in prison have some amount of respect. That they don't get harassed or aren't at the bottom of the hierarchy. Is this true? If you say you're a hacker will people just leave you alone. "This has been true for almost every facility I've been to so far. Most criminals are either afraid that as a hacker you can do things like increase their sentence, or they're just interested in it because they wish they could make money with it as opposed to robbing people, stealing cars, selling drugs, or whatever they're there for. Most of them don't understand the amount of time and devotion it takes to learn to hack. So to answer your question, yes, most people just leave you alone. The others are too busy asking you questions to harass you."
Wow I really didn't think it would work that way. I thought hackers would be the bottom of the food-chain, but that's pretty interesting that some of the tough-guys are intrigued/cautious of a hackers intelligence. "I was surprised too. Unsurprisingly, the bottom of the food chain is reserved for those with sexual offense cases (especially the ones involving children)."
What do you plan on doing once you're out? "I regret some of them. I'm still not completely sure what I'll be doing when I get out. No suits. Just body armor and AR-15's."
How were you detained? black suited men with glasses show up at your doorstep? I sent him all your questions, but I can answer the last one (how he was detained) based on what he told me face to face. He said the FBI called something like a few days to a week in advance and asked him some questions. At that point he knew he was likely going to be detained, so he got rid of a bunch of hard drives and stuff. It was an unmarked black Crown Vic and two or three federal agents knocked on his door. He'd seen them pull up and decided to leave a cigarette lit so he'd have one last minute of freedom or something to that effect. When they knocked he answered and told them just a moment he needed to put out his cigarette. He went upstairs and did that, then came down and they politely handcuffed him and put him in the backseat of their car. He said they were asking him questions about his hacking and seemed very curious, but he kept his answers short and uninformative.
Very newmanian Haha, so true.
Did he know he was going to get caught at some point? Or was he positive he would be able to get away with it? I must say that's pretty risky. I remember him telling me that Digital River (the company he hacked) patched the vulnerabilities he was using several times, and that's probably one of the main reasons why he was caught. He got greedy and kept going back in even after he knew they were aware of his break-in.
1) Are you self taught? 1) "Yes."
2) When did you start this activity? how old were you? 2) "I was about 10 or 11 when I first became interested in hacking."
3) Did you do it for the challenge or the money? 3) "Always the challenge. When I ended up needing some money, I looked at what I already had access to instead of hacking something new."
You started when you where 10 or 11 i am guessing there was a porn blocker on your computer right. "Thankfully, no porn blocker. It all started when I saw someone on AOL use a "punter" to kick another user offline. I wanted to know everything about how they worked. Now I know they were just Visual Basic programs that sent instant messages containing HTML that the AOL client didn't expect (i.e., "") which would cause it to crash."
So nerdinja, what were YOU in jail for? I feel this may be a more interesting ama then waiting around for a hacker to reply to questions. After dosing 5 grams of indoor grown psilocybin mushrooms (often referred to as a "heroic dosage") I ended up in jail with aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon charges. But that's beside the point.
Similar thing happened to me. Took 5 grams, freaked out, started driving got pulled over and fought four cops. I woke up in jail with a dislocated shoulder being charged with battery on a peace officer and resisting arrest. It happens to the best of us, hope your shoulder turned out okay and that you didn't spend too much time tangling with the legal system. Also relevant username ftw.
Who/ why did you rob someone? ( other then because you were high) Did you still do mushrooms? 1) I was sold ounces of the mushrooms at a time and then I would sell them 2) I "robbed" Radioshack of a VGA cable and an audio cable because I was out of my mind after staying up for five days in a row 3) I remember the majority of it, in fact I still have a file called "relax and take notes.txt" that I wrote while tripping my balls off. 4) I dropped one cap not too long ago at a friends house when somebody offered me one, I enjoyed it, but as I was coming down I got the slight paranoid feeling I had originally experienced.
Actually I'm not. I'm genuinely more interested in your story then the hacker story seriously. How did the police treat you? They tased me bro. Literally, haha. I leaped at them and yelled at the top of my lungs when they came to arrest me.
We're gonna need to see that file now, nerd ninja Edited to correct piss-poor spelling. ಠ_ಠ.
[5 days on 5 grams? bullshit, when I was 16 I ate 1/3 ounce (9 grams) and tripped for 10 hours...I'm not saying you didn't rob a radioshack and get tased and spend time in prison...but 5 days? for 5 grams? naaaah....] Cool. I'm not asking anybody to believe me, hell I'd prefer for you NOT to believe me as the story is highly embarrassing. There you go Mr. internet guy.
Not to laugh. But I laughed. Did you try to fight them? In that mindset (psychotic) I don't know what I was thinking. I think that at that exact moment I thought they were holograms or psychic projections or something, and that if I jumped and battle cried loud enough they'd disappear or dissolve or something ._.
I didn't actually get a chance to lay a finger on either one of the cops (there were two) as they tased me quicker than you can say buhgina. It wasn't one of those puny handheld tasers either, it was the projectile hook in your fucking chest kind of taser.
Please? Please what?
That shit leaves scars. So as someone who has never tripped, what was your 5 day expeirence like? What do you remember most? The only thing I can relate to it is my friend took acid and wound up wandering into a grocery store. He said the whole place in his mind started on fire and a grocery employee came up to him and said " areeee youuu ooohhhkayyyy?" Being somebody who enjoys altered states, I will say that experience was the worst possible thing that could have happened. I lost all basis in reality, couldn't discern whether I was awake or dreaming, I was convinced I was time traveling and doing all sorts of fictional things, it was all around just a bad experience. I've dropped one other psychedelic since and actually had a great time (2-CE, 8-10mg in a capsule) so it's not that I'm against drugs or anything, it's just I went a little overboard with the shrooms and I believe I achieved what some might call "ego loss" when I was definitely not ready to take a hard look at myself without an ego.
Please let us see the file. What is this file you speak of?!
1) did you hack the gibson? 1) "Yes, although it was running several psybnc's as "./httpd" and had a few suids in /tmp/ for some reason."
2) how do you feel about how 'movies and tv' portray people who work with computers or do what you did? 2) "They usually get it wrong. They're usually depicted as evil masterminds who want to steal your bank accounts and read your emails (I'm the exception, not the rule). It's also a lot less visual than movies like "Hackers" and "Swordfish" make it seem."
What motivated you to freely share oceanographic data from NASA's satellites? Was there something special that you thought needed to be made public? "Actually, I have no idea what they were talking about (No, seriously). I never touched that database. I basically just got into the system, looked around, then left. I didn't bring it up in court because it wouldn't have effected my sentencing either way."
How long were you on the payroll? And did you have a plan to back out at a certain point because I imagine you knew this could not go on forever and that somewhere along the line you'd get caught. "I was on the system for about 5 or 6 years, but didn't actually try taking money from it until about 2 years ago. I didn't have any alternate plans at the time. In my mind, I always assumed I would have found something else if Digital River ever dried up."
What's Kate Upton's email password? Kate123.
Is he going back into hacking when he gets out? I imagine he's not going to want to answer that one, to be honest. But I sent it anyway.
Do you sincerely regret stealing large amounts of money? "Yes, because there's no reason I couldn't have obtained large amounts of money legally. I was just being lazy."
Is there any way for me to put money on his books? Of course, man. I'm sure he'd be super stoked to hear even that somebody offered. PM me and I'll tell you how.
Are you serious? they have them as dirt cheap labor and they are charging him to communicate? I don't think he actually works in there. As far as he explained, you have a choice of working to get money put on your books, or not.
What programming language is your favorite to code in? What can we do to protect ourselves better from normal rootkits and things like that? "Perl! "Normal rootkits" can usually be avoided by maintaining a remote database of checksums for all of your local system binaries (i.e., with Tripwire). That along with up to date patches, strong passwords, and a little common sense should help."
I find it difficult to believe that a convicted hacker has any access to a computer while in prison. Federal prisoners are allowed access to a very simple computer that has a calendar, contacts list, and email client. Read up on CorrLinks if you don't believe me. It costs him I think $.05/minute to check it, which comes out of his commissary funds.
How many "favors" does it cost him to send/check email? "2. Is there a charge for using this site? Charges for using this site are based upon agreements with Correctional agencies. This site does not charge for sending or receiving messages from inmates at Federal Bureau of Prisons facilities with TRULINCS. Sending messages to Iowa inmates costs $0.25 per message."
I'm a lawyer, not a convict, for what it's worth. Thanks, sir. I've always found it curious that there are those who fake AMAs, and I'm certainly not one of them. Just thought you guys might find this interesting.
Why did you hack, even though you knew it was wrong? (feel free not to answer that one, it might seem a bit personal) Was it really difficult to do what you did , even though you knew what you were doing? Like, was the process of hacking those websites difficult? "I wouldn't consider hacking wrong, but what I did wasn't just hacking, it was also theft. At that time, morality was the last thing on my mind. I had lost my job and needed money. I'm not saying this was my only option, just that it was the easiest. As for the hacking difficulty, it wasn't much of a challenge gaining access. Figuring out the correct database that handled payments was the hard part (A lot of duplicate databases on the system that were unused)."
I just think it is funny that they gave a computer hacker access to a computer, kind of like giving a heroin addict his fix. Not really, it's more like giving a heroin addict needles but no heroin.
How old are you? I recall him being 26 when I met him about 6-8 months ago. He may be 27 by now.
"27 now. 26 at the time of my arrest."
Time to make some FREE PARKER T-shirts and bumper stickers. Would it be possible to write to Mr Parker myself? As a fellow "Information Freedom Fighter & Network Security Professional I would have tons to talk about ( without being illegal ). That's super nice of you, I'll definitely be sending him your comment. The way the CorrLinks system works is he has to have your email address, and request contact with you from the inside. PM me your address and I'll shoot it to him. If he requests contact with you, you should get an email explaining how to setup your account at CorrLink's website.
"I've only got like 14 mins left on this thing. Tell digitalmatter to setup a donation page for me so people can Western Union me some money for email ;D But that might sound weird."
They gave you a computer and internet access? Isnt that liking giving a child molester a 12 year old? Not much you can do with such a locked down email only system, so no, not really. If you're doubting the authenticity of the AMA then I'd be glad to provide more proof. Just ask.
What were some "small" hacking projects you did before getting the courage to do Digital River? "Digital River was a "small" hacking project compared to some other things I've hacked :-P But since I'm only charged with Digital River, disregards that. :-x"
Why did you choose Digital River? Did they seem more vulnerable than other companies? "It was more vulnerable, but ran by people competent enough to make it a little more challenging."
What's an average day in the prison you're in? "Uneventful ;-)"
Where, when and how (meaning self-taught, etc) did he learn to hack? "IRC, 1994, Self-taught."
"(Heh, that one was short)"
Is your mom mad at you? "I think she knows I've been punished enough and her being angry won't help any."
When is he getting out? I'm not sure, he only had like 9 months on his Federal sentence but there were other complications that are going to end him up in TDC for a year or two once he's released from the fed.
Wait you met him in jail but you've never been to prison? I'm sure I'm just misunderstanding the difference between jail/prison. Jail is where you're housed temporarily (usually max of a year) while going to court and such, prison is where you serve out your sentence.
How did you get into computer hacking? "I think I answered this in another question. The (very) short version is: AOL punters -> warez.com -> DALnet -> everything else."
What's was your "magnum opus" in hacking? (AKA, what was the moment you realized you were really good at this?) "I haven't reached it yet >:-D"
What about tax stuff? If you were on the payroll, and having the checks mailed to you with accurate info, wouldn't the company send you a W-2 also? "If I remember correctly, taxes were done on the system with a web interface, though I'm probably misremembering."
Interesting! Haha, kind of a short answer, I know. But I'm just relaying his responses verbatim.
Understandable :p frankly I didn't even expect you to see my comment anyway, so this is cool lol. I've spent a large part of my time off from work responding to comments, upvoting, downvoting, and relaying responses. Shit's hard work, I feel like I need a secretary!
Bad news bud. You are the secretary. Facepalm.
What's the best language(s) and OS(es) for hacking, and where would be the best place to learn it/them? I'm pretty good at programming but not too great with security stuff, so I'm interested in knowing this (mostly to defend my servers/websites, ofc). "Languages that would help: C, Assembly, Perl/Python, Bash; OSes: Backtrack 5 (or any Linux), along with the other *nixes (BSD/Solaris). The internet's a good place to start (Google is your friend)."
Can any computer connected to the internet truly be "hackproof"? Or can a smart enough hacker gain access to anything as long as he's determined enough? "No computer can be made 100% "hackproof", but there are things you can do to make it extremely difficult to get into your system. Luckily, the few with enough skill to get into (almost) everything won't be paying any attention to your system ;-)"
Ever goto Defcon? Do you use backtrack? Or compile all the tools your self? I'll send him the question, but I know he has used Backtrack in the past, and spoke pretty highly of it. Hearing him talk about it made me want to try it.
Question: What are the best Computer Science and Math classes to take, if I want to learn about reverse-engineering commercial software? "I wouldn't know what classes are available these days, but there was an old site I used to frequent @ Link to protools.cjb.net that (If it's still there) has lots of (de)crypters/(de)compilers/(dis)assemblers/tutorials/etc. that would be very useful in reverse engineering."
What's the food like? "Edible(ish)"
Has the Government/Anyone else offered you any Jobs in IT once out of prison? I hear lots of hackers get picked up once out. Problem: he's still in prison.
What is the first thing you will do when you get out? Are there any online communities you miss being a part of? "I'm sure it'll involve random womenfolk and fewd. After that, I'm not sure yet. I wasn't really part of anything besides IRC, and I stopped that a year or two before my arrest. In the end, it was just me and my lonesome hacking the planet for fun and profit."
Would you say that it is cracking that you have done and not hacking? I'm going to send him this question, but I can answer this myself. Cracking is usually reverse engineering software, whereas the word hacking, in most cases, is used to describe accessing computers and/or networks you're not supposed to have access to. He hacks, but he can probably crack software as well if he wanted to.
Five hours later the only question anyone cares about isn't answered. Patience is a virtue. He's working on getting his responses to me asap.
That's just totally not true. 5 grams of dried mushrooms is a lot. Most people do like 2 grams at a time...max. That being said...there's no way he was tripping for 5 days after 5 grams. 5 grams is a lot and anyone who claims differently is either inexperienced or outright lying. I was up for 5 days, without exaggeration. According to a few of my friends I dosed 1-2 grams more here and there. It was mainly the psychotic/manic episode that kept me up. I even had a friends mother give me 200mg of Seroquel and I still remained awake.
Maybe the quality of these were insane. I have a very high tolerance for hallucinogens. They were well grown indoor psilocybin with great big bronze bottomed stems, deep purple veins, etc. Who knows how strong they actually were, but they definitely were the catalyst for my 'episode' if you want to call it that.
Haha. The doses that people on erowid take are much higher than the average person. Those guys are pros. Geoffrey clearly doesn't know all that much about actual psychedelics. Reading Erowid is one thing, having your hands on good stuff is another. I find it fishy that he's measuring doses as ".176 ounces" ... who does that?
It's schwag vs. dro, man. Exactly. Field shrooms you could probably drop a half ounce of. Indoor well grown shrooms and three grams is getting close to a high dosage.
Lol when he took the .25oz they were well grown indoor shrooms. Taken multiple times from many different sources. Usually indoors because that is what is easier to grow in this area. Tripped balls, but not FIVE days and you remember everything. Well you see, the mind is a complicated thing. You find a vast difference in brain chemistry from one human to another, not to mention behavioral patterns, how you were raised, pre-existing psychological disorders, etc. I don't get what you are trying to prove here, Geoffreyhach. That I am bluffing about going crazy and doing something seriously stupid? Think about it for a second.
Do the mistakes that you made that led up to you being caught seem obvious now. "Very. (Proxy servers only work when you use them. Best to use a VPN that's setup as your default route so that you can't access anything on the internet without it going through your VPN... And don't wire any money to your own bank account, it's not very smart)."
You were great in Swordfish. "It was fun working with John Travolta, and Halle berry looks great topless!"
Can't say I have any greater respect for a lawyer than I would a convict to be honest. Zing.
Hardware has little effect on hacking capabilities. Wooosh.
What do you drink while in the Penn. Ive sent him the question, but I remember him telling me about this when we met. They call it "hooch" and it's just highly fermented fruit and sugar. They store it in trash bags in the toilets when the guards "shake down" the cells. He told me of one experience where him and another guy had to drink a metric ton of hooch so they didn't get caught, got super drunk.
"Copheee! (When I can afford it)"
I need to start making a list of people drink, this is the first time it has been a, "metric ton of hooch out of a garbage bag from a toilet." Relevant username ftw. For the record I wasn't the one drinking the hooch, and I don't think it ever touched any doodoo water.
I understand. People rarely thing about what there drinking, yet water will keep them alive longer then food will. TY for Response!!! Yes, yes it will (as I take a sip of Dr. Pepper Ten, in all its high fructose syrup glory)
Hey! im from Minnesota you bastard! "Well I'm from Texas, so screw Minnesota!"
I will have to pass along the question although I am pretty sure I know the answer. It has been a few months since we met but I will have to double check the answer with him. I dont regret any interactions but I will have to get back to you on that! I don't understand you. There have been multiple AMAs where there's a middle man forwarding the messages to somebody else. What's the big deal? Does it make it any less authentic? Are his responses losing meaning as the bytes pass through the interwebs?
Why the hell would you want to FREE this guy? He stole $275,000. That's not anything like a victimless crime, it's just simple theft. If you ask me it was a victimless crime seeing as how the money was most likely insured. Having met the guy I can tell he's genuinely a nice person, kind, compassionate, and wouldn't harm a fly. Different strokes for different folks though, I suppose.
People on the internet are weirdly aggressive. Yeah, but it still surprises me when I see it.
Do they molester you? In all seriousness, If(youFeelGuilty) { print "why do you feel guilty" }else { print "why not?"} "Thankfully, no molestering. And youFeelGuilty = "alittle\n"; /* cause stealing is wrong */"
Fine I will tone it down. I have no respect for you or the hacker you are in communication with. He is a thief, and you stated you see no problem in it. That is all. And yes I have, when I was a young teen not realizing the damage I was causing musicians and the record industry. I now use Spotify. I understand. Thanks for the comments.
How did you gain the knowledge of hacking? Like what were the first steps to learn how to code and stuff? It seems like one of those things you can find a youtube how-to... "Hacking isn't just coding, but that is a large part of it. I'd rather not go into the philosophy or definition of hacking because it's been done many times before by people much smarter than me. I doubt a site or video will teach you everything you need to know. Your best bet is to first learn everything about your own system (i.e., What programs are running in the background? What do they each do? What tcp/udp ports are open? Why are they open? etc.). If you get into hacking just to learn how to break into computers then you'll probably end up in jail. But if you learn because you're interested in every aspect of networking/computing then you'll probably have a future in it."
Last updated: 2012-03-26 01:38 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
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